International Trade
Goods-Producing Industries (NAICS 11-33)

Under this topic you will find information on imports, exports and trade balance for the Goods-Producing industries (NAICS 11-33). The data used for this topic were obtained through Trade Data Online. Trade Data Online provides the ability to generate customized reports on Canadian and U.S. trade in goods with over 200 countries.



Exports

In this section we examine total merchandise exports allocated to the goods-producing division of the Canadian economy. Total exports include all goods leaving the country (through customs) for a foreign destination. It consists of the sum of domestic exports (goods grown, produced, extracted or manufactured in Canada) and re-exports (goods that have previously entered Canada and are leaving in the same condition).

Total Exports: 2004-2013
(NAICS 11-33)
NAICS
Code
Sector Value in $ billions CAGRFootnote1
2004-2013
% Change
2012-2013
2004 2013
11 Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting 12.3 26.3 8.8% 8.7%
21 Mining and Oil and Gas Extraction 65.0 130.3 8.0% 6.4%
22 Utilities 2.0 2.5 2.2% 27.6%
31-33 Manufacturing 309.6 293.7 -0.6% 1.8%
 
11-33 Goods-Producing Industries 388.9 452.8 1.7% 3.6%

Source: Statistics Canada, special tabulation, unpublished data, Canadian International Merchandise Trade, 2004 to 2013.

In 2013, total exports allocated to the goods-producing industries were $452.8 billion dollars. Over the past 10 years, the value of these exports had a growth rate of 1.7% per year on average. Over the course of the most recent year, total exports increased by 3.6%.

Total exports: 2004-2013
(NAICS 11, 21, 22, 31-33)

Source: Statistics Canada, special tabulation, unpublished data, Canadian International Merchandise Trade, 2004 to 2013.

The majority of Canadian merchandise trade is allocated to the Manufacturing sector (NAICS 31-33). In 2004, manufacturing exports were valued at $309.6 billion, and declined at a rate of 0.6% per year on average, decreasing to a value of $293.7 billion in 2013.

Mining and Oil and Gas Extraction (NAICS 21) represents the second largest export sector, increasing by 6.4% within the most recent year, to a value of $130.3 billion in 2013.

While exports allocated to the Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting (NAICS 11) sector only represent a small portion of the exports for the Goods-Producing industries, values of these exports had been on the rise in recent years. Over the course of the most recent year, exports increased 8.7% from $24.2 billion to $26.3 billion.

Exports of products allocated to the Utilities (NAICS 22) sector is demonstrating a increase in 2013. The value of the exports increased by 27.6%, to $2.5 billion.

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Imports

In this section we examine Canadian merchandise trade statistics for total imports allocated to the goods-producing industries. Total imports include all goods which have entered the country (Canada) by crossing territorial (customs) boundaries, whether for immediate domestic consumption or for storage in customs bonded warehouses.

Total Imports: 2004-2013
(NAICS 11-33)
NAICS
Code
Sector Value in $ billions CAGRFootnote1
2004-2013
% Change
2012-2013
2004 2013
11 Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting 7.4 10.8 4.3% 8.9%
21 Mining and Oil and Gas Extraction 23.1 46.0 8.0% -6.1%
22 Utilities 1.1 0.4 -11.7% 45.8%
31-33 Manufacturing 314.1 403.6 2.8% 3.7%
 
11-33 Goods-Producing Industries 345.6 460.8 3.2% 2.8%

Source: Statistics Canada, special tabulation, unpublished data, Canadian International Merchandise Trade, 2004 to 2013.

Imports allocated to the goods-producing industries increased to $460.8 billion in 2013, up 2.8% from the 2012 level of imports. Over the past 10 years, import levels have averaged 3.2% annual growth.

Total Imports: 2004-2013
(NAICS 11, 21, 22, 31-33)

Source: Statistics Canada, special tabulation, unpublished data, Canadian International Merchandise Trade, 2003 to 2012.

The vast majority of Canadian imports are allocated to the Manufacturing (NAICS 31-33) sector of the economy. Imports for this sector have increased by 2.8% on average since 2004, reaching $403.6 billion in 2013. Over the course of the most recent year, import values increased by 3.7%.

Imports allocated to the Mining and Oil and Gas Extraction (NAICS 21) sector decreased from $49.0 billion in 2012, to $46.0 billion in 2013. Over the course of the most recent year, import values have decreased by 6.1%.

Imports allocated to the Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting (NAICS 11) sector reached $10.8 billion in 2013, up from $9.9 billion in 2012. Since 2004, imports averaged 4.3% growth per year.

The value of imports for the Utilities (NAICS 22) sector was $0.2 billion in 2012, and rose to $0.3 billion in 2013.

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Trade balance

In this section we examine Canada's total trade balance which is the difference between exports and imports of goods between the Canada and its international trading partners. It is calculated by subtracting total imports from total exports.

In general, if a country imports more goods than it exports, its trade balance is negative (trade deficit). If the country exports more goods than it imports, the trade balance is positive (trade surplus).

Exports, Imports and Trade Balance: 2004-2013
(NAICS 11-33)

Source: Statistics Canada, special tabulation, unpublished data, Canadian International Merchandise Trade, 2004 to 2013.

During the years preceding 2009, the export and import values allocated to the Goods-producing division followed similar patterns, resulting in a fairly stable trade surplus. However, in 2013, Canada recorded a trade deficit of $3.5 billion, improving from a deficit of 7.2 billion in 2012.

Trade Balance: 2004-2013
(NAICS 11-33)
NAICS
Code
Sector Value in $ billions CAGRFootnote1
2004-2013
% Change
2012-2013
2004 2013
11 Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting 4.9 15.5 13.7% 8.5%
21 Mining and Oil and Gas Extraction 41.9 84.3 8.1% 14.7%
22 Utilities 0.9 2.1 9.7% 25.0%
31-33 Manufacturing -4.5 -109.9 42.7 9.5%
 
11-33 Goods-Producing Industries 43.2 -8.0 -182.9 26.8%

Source: Statistics Canada, special tabulation, unpublished data, Canadian International Merchandise Trade, 2004 to 2013.


Trade Balance: 2004-2013
(NAICS 11, 21, 22, 31-33)

Source: Statistics Canada, special tabulation, unpublished data, Canadian International Merchandise Trade, 2004 to 2013.

The Manufacturing sector (NAICS 31-33) was the only goods-producing sector to post a deficit in 2013. This deficit was $109.9 billion, compared to 2012's deficit of $100.4 billion.

The Mining and Oil and Gas Extraction sector (NAICS 21) posted a surplus of $84.3 billion, compared to the $73.5 billion surplus in 2012. Since 2004, the surplus has grown 8.1% per year on average.

The Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting sector (NAICS 11) has also posted a stable surplus throughout the past 10 years, with a $15.5 billion surplus posted in 2013. This was a increase of 8.5% from the size of the 2012 surplus. Over a ten year span, the surplus averaged 13.7% growth per year.

Little trade is allocated to the Utilities sector (NAICS 22), which posted a trade surplus of $2.1 billion, increasing by 25% from the $1.7 billion surplus in 2012.

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Notes on international trade data

The data in this section come from Statistics Canada's Canadian International Merchandise Trade Database via Industry Canada's Trade Data Online website. Data are presented on a customs basis. All dollar amounts are presented in current Canadian dollars, meaning the effects of price inflation/deflation are not factored in.

International trade statistics are disseminated by Statistics Canada on a monthly basis. Complete data for 2013 were first made available in February and are scheduled to be revised in March, April and May as well as on the quarterly release dates in August, November and February. Data for the previous two years are also revised in February.

Industry-based trade data is derived from product-based trade data. While the majority of merchandise trade data is allocated to goods-producing industries, some is allocated to a small number of primarily services-producing industries or cannot be allocated to a particular industry. As a result, trade totals for the goods-producing division of the economy will not equal totals found in the international trade section at the Canadian Economy level of Canadian Industry Statistics.

Although the Construction sector (NAICS 23) is within the Goods-Producing division of the Canadian economy, no trade data is allocated to this sector.

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Compound Annual Growth Rate

Return to footnote 1 referrer