Trade - Canadian Industry Statistics

Dry Pea and Bean Farming - 11113

The information is provided through links to selected reports in Trade Data Online. You can use this information to identify export opportunities, identify opportunities to replace imported goods with your own, assess the export intensity of the subsector and determine the apparent size of the domestic market.

Exports

Total exports include all goods leaving the country (through customs) for a foreign destination. It consists of the sum of domestic exports and re-exports.

Total exports = domestic exports + re-exports

Domestic exports consist of the exports of all goods grown, produced, extracted or manufactured in the country (Canada) leaving the country (through customs) for a foreign destination. Exports of imported merchandise which has been substantially enhanced in value are also included.

On the other hand, re-exports refer to the export of goods that have previously entered the country (Canada) and are leaving in the same condition as when first imported. Exports of imported merchandise which has been minimally processed but NOT substantially enhanced in value are also counted as re-exports.

The following links request the Trade Data Online application to generate on-the-fly reports using the latest available data from Statistics Canada:

Imports

Total imports include all goods which have entered the country (Canada) by crossing territorial (customs) boundaries, whether for immediate domestic consumption or for storage in customs bonded warehouses.

The re-imports (included in Total Imports) refer to goods re-entering (returned to) Canada after having been exported abroad without having been materially altered or substantially enhanced in value while abroad.

The following links request the Trade Data Online application to generate on-the-fly reports using the latest available data from Statistics Canada.

Trade Balance

The balance of trade represents the difference between exports and imports of goods between the country (Canada) and one (or more) of its international trading partners.

Trade balance = total exports - total imports

If the country imports more goods than it exports, the trade balance is negative (trade deficit) . If the country exports more goods than it imports, the trade balance is positive (trade surplus).

The following link requests the Trade Data Online application to generate on-the-fly reports using the latest available data from Statistics Canada.

  • Notes

    The current section contains links to selected reports in Trade Data Online to illustrate the type of information that can be viewed. However, once you access the Trade Data Online application, you are free to customize the selections by changing parameters in the main panel above the reports.

    The main panel allows you the select the trade type (imports, exports, trade balance, etc.), the time period (5 or 10 years, selected years, year to date etc.), the currency (Canadian or U.S. dollars), the domestic region (All Canada, individual provinces etc.), the trading partners (world total, list of all countries, Top 10 trading partners, over 320 individual countries, predefined geographic areas, etc.) as well as selected the NAICS codes.

    Data are available from 1992 to present for primary industries (e.g. agriculture, forestry, fishing, mining, oil and gas extraction etc.) as well as manufacturing industries.

    In addition to printing the reports or graphs, Trade Data Online also allows you to download the data in comma-delimited (CSV) format or as an Excel Spreadsheet file to save customized collections of reports for future use.

    The data comes from Statistics Canada's Canadian International Merchandise Trade Database.

    Please note that Industry-based trade data (which is classified according to NAICS) is derived from product-based trade data (which is classified according to HS). The primary purpose for the recompilation by industry is to provide a basis for estimating the apparent domestic market for a collection of fabricated goods by combining manufacturing production data with trade data. This type of data integration carries with it a number of potential pitfalls and important limitations.

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